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One Powerful Way you can Improve your Working Memory

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ custom_padding_last_edited=”on|desktop” admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_image=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/011.jpg” custom_padding_tablet=”50px|0|50px|0″ padding_mobile=”off”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_divider show_divider=”off” height=”200″ disabled_on=”on|on|off” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#ffffff” text_font_size=”72″ text_font_size_tablet=”52″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”0px||0px|”]One powerful way for improving your Working Memory
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ custom_padding_last_edited=”on|desktop” admin_label=”Section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#f7f7f4″ custom_padding_tablet=”50px|0|50px|0″ padding_mobile=”off”][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/JOC-circular-photo-e1495823688378.png” show_bottom_space=”off” align=”center” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ custom_margin=”-100px|||” animation=”off” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Author name” _builder_version=”3.5″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#323232″ text_font_size=”18″ text_line_height=”1.4em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”14px||0px|”]

George Castaneda PhD,  CEO,  World Brain Academy

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_divider show_divider=”off” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ custom_css_main_element=”width:20px;” hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Article month and year” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”18″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”-10px||0px|”]Working Memory
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Categories” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#3073d1″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”20px|||”]Mind Mapping

Creativity
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 1 ” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”24″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.4em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”10px||0px|”]Whenever we execute tasks entailing reasoning, comprehension, creativity, and learning, we use our working memory. It allows us to hold relevant information in the conscious part of our brain.  When performing the act of ‘thinking’, it manipulates information through the complex interaction with other brain networks, going back and forth between the unconscious and conscious networks.
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 2″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]Therefore, working memory could be conceived as a powerful mental scratch pad that not only stores your thoughts and ideas in the short term, but more importantly, enables to combine, reorganize, and synthesize information in meaningful ways for formulating hypotheses, generating ideas, solving problems, understanding things, making decisions, reaching conclusions, predicting the future, and even thinking about thinking (metacognition).

As recent research has found (Chuderski, 2013), working memory strongly correlates with fluid intelligence and reasoning. Therefore, working memory is a key resource for complex cognition.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”50px|||” custom_padding_tablet=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” custom_padding_last_edited=”on|tablet” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Brain-Background-Depositphotos_132375520_original-e1494261835725.jpg” show_bottom_space=”off” admin_label=”Image – blog” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Image description” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”16″ text_line_height=”1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”20px||0px|”]Working Memory: the engine of conscious thinking
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Image credits” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”12″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”6px|||”]Illustration by Kendo Kumuri
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]However, working memory has very limited resources that require high cognitive loads. People’s performance declines rapidly with an increase in memory demand in a wide variety of tasks. Memory demand could be equated to the number of independent items that must be simultaneously available in working memory for processing. According to Miller (1956), working memory could hold between 5 to 9 items simultaneously. More recent studies, however, have argued that the capacity limit reflects a limitation of the focus of attention to be directed to a maximum of about four chunks (Conway, Cowan & Bounting, 2001).

So how could you improve this powerful and sophisticated, yet resource-hungry and somewhat limited engine? In this article, we offer one powerful way for using your working memory both efficiently and effectively: represent your problem graphically.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”50px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – quote” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”48″ text_font_size_tablet=”38″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.3em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” max_width=”900px” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”16px||30px|”]”Graphical representations store information externally, freeing up working memory resources for other aspects of thinking”
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]

People show large improvements in fluid reasoning after learning how to draw diagrams to represent a problem (Nickerson, 2003). Graphical representations store information externally, freeing up working memory resources for other aspects of thinking, serving as the knowledge store. A second advantage is that graphical representations organize knowledge by indexing it spatially, thus reflecting the relationships among the different items of a given problem. For example, if the representation of two items is close in the graphic, it is likely that those items are also close in the problem at hand. Therefore, a spatial arrangement of information allows for interpreting and making inferences of the problem: you could grasp the gist of the problem while seeing how its items interact with the problem. Moreover, when nonvisual information is mapped onto visual variables, patterns often emerge that were not explicitly built in, but which are easily grasped by the graphical representation of the problem (Card, et al., 1999). These representations enable complex reasoning computations to be replaced by simple pattern recognition processes.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Memroy-background-in-3d.png” show_in_lightbox=”on” always_center_on_mobile=”off” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ max_width=”140px” custom_margin=”36px||0px|” animation_style=”slide” animation_direction=”left” animation_duration=”500ms” animation_intensity_slide=”10%”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”16″ text_line_height=”1.1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”140px” custom_margin=”16px||0px|”]Mind Maps: The analogy of Brain Architecture
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.89″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”12″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”140px” custom_margin=”6px|||”]Illustration by Karen Jones
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 5″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]There are multiple ways for representing knowledge graphically. One of the most powerful is Mind Mapping, which epitomizes the architecture of brain thinking. By drawing images and keywords in a radiant hierarchy, like the branches of a tree, Mind Maps (Buzan & Buzan, 1996) depict a problem, explain its implications and even come up with possible solutions after recombining the information in new meaningful ways. This approach infuses meaning to the whole picture while being able to discern the different categories (chunks) of the problem and their relationships as well. The usage of visual triggers within the diagram, such as images and graphics, makes it easier to recall information later.

The following Mind Map illustrates how Tony Buzan, the inventor of this methodology, designed his book titled “Head Strong”. The main branches represent the chapters of the book, while the sub-branches encapsulate the key information within the chapters. Notice how Tony uses a combination of images, keywords, color and associations to represent the gist of his 300-page book into a single-page canvas.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/MM-Tony-Buzan-Head-Strong-with-perimeter.png” show_bottom_space=”off” admin_label=”Image – blog” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Image description” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”16″ text_line_height=”1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”-25px||0px|” custom_margin_tablet=”-5px||0px|” custom_margin_phone=”0px|||” custom_margin_last_edited=”on|desktop” custom_padding=”0px|||”]Head Strong Mind Map
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Image credits” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”12″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”6px|||”]Developed by Tony Buzan
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|||” custom_margin=”-20px|||” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” padding_top_1=”0px” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ padding_top=”0px” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 6″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”0px||0px|” custom_padding=”0px|||”]

Mind Mapping allows people to draw on all aspects of their intellectual and creative abilities simultaneously. The process of creating a Mind Map helps them commit information to memory, enables them to visualize concepts and the way they relate to one another, and enhances creative thinking and problem solving skills. In other words, Mind Maps use the otherwise limited capacities of working memory in a very powerful way.

Several studies have pointed out that people have benefited from increased attention, organized thinking, and a better approach for sharing ideas by adopting this methodology.  Deciding the structure of the Mind Map, its layout, its keywords and images, and the overall organization of the information it contains, builds critical thinking abilities, and improves problem solving skills.

By using all thought functions simultaneously, including creative and rational thinking, Mind Maps allow people to expand their overall thinking ability and train themselves to think more robustly in the future. They eliminate the single method of approaching a concept or idea and instead employ multiple thought processes without overtaxing the limited but very sophisticated capacities of our working memory.
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References

Buzan, T. & Buzan, B. (1996): The Mind Map Book: How to Use Radiant Thinking to Maximize Your Brain’s Untapped Potential. New York, NY: Plume.

Card, S. K., Mackinlay, J. D., & Shneiderman, B. (1999). Readings in information visualization: using vision to think. Morgan Kaufmann.

Chuderski, A. (2013). When are fluid intelligence and working memory isomorphic and when are they not? Intelligence41(4), 244-262.

Conway, A. R., Cowan, N., & Bunting, M. F. (2001). The cocktail party phenomenon revisited: The importance of working memory capacity. Psychonomic bulletin & review8(2), 331-335.

Miller, G. A. (1956). The magical number seven, plus or minus two: some limits on our capacity for processing information. Psychological review63(2), 81.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”Section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#222222″ custom_padding=”0px||0px|”][et_pb_row make_fullwidth=”on” use_custom_gutter=”on” gutter_width=”2″ custom_padding=”40px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” parallax_method_3=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Human-Memory-e1494269459501.jpg” url=”#” show_bottom_space=”off” align=”center” force_fullwidth=”on” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#888888″ text_font_size=”12″ text_letter_spacing=”2px” text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”30px|||”]MEMORY
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Improve your Thinking and Expand your Life

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[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#ffffff” text_font_size=”24″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center”]Learn how to Learn for a Lifetime
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Who do you think is the Greatest Thinker of All Time?

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ custom_padding_last_edited=”on|desktop” admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_image=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Roding-thinker-1-e1494288451332.jpg” parallax=”on” custom_padding_tablet=”50px|0|50px|0″ padding_mobile=”off”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_divider show_divider=”off” height=”200″ disabled_on=”on|on|off” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#ffffff” text_font_size=”72″ text_font_size_tablet=”52″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.1em” header_font_size=”25px” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”0px||0px|”]Greatest thinker?
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ custom_padding_last_edited=”on|desktop” admin_label=”Section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#f7f7f4″ custom_padding_tablet=”50px|0|50px|0″ padding_mobile=”off”][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – article day” _builder_version=”3.5″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#323232″ text_font_size=”10em” text_line_height=”1.1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”0px||0px|”][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Article month and year” _builder_version=”3.4.1″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”18″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”-10px||0px|”]GREATEST THINKER
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Categories” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#3073d1″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”20px|||”]Thinking

Creativity

Brain Capital
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 1 ” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”24″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.4em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”10px||0px|”]Who is the greatest thinker of all time? Gurus and legendary thinkers of the past like Leonardo da Vinci, Aristotle, Sosipatra of Ephesus, Queen Elizabeth I, Galileo or Socrates may come to your mind immediately. Some may feel that contemporary thinkers like Albert Einstein, Maria Montessori, Stephen Hawking, Steve Jobs or perhaps Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page are not only smart, but their ideas and contributions have impacted millions of people in our present lifetime. They have also generated huge wealth for themselves. Does this mean the contemporary group of thinkers are better than those in the past?
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 2″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]If I need to stake my claim on this, I dare say the contemporary group of thinkers has a competitive edge because we are equipped with the newest brain model than our fore fathers centuries ago. Scientific research has shown that the brain has actually evolved throughout the history of mankind. As early humans faced new environmental challenges, they evolved larger and more complex brains with their bigger bodies. Large, complex brains can then process and store more information. This was advantageous to humans in their social interactions and encounters with unfamiliar habitats. The modern human brain is the largest and most complex of any living primate, for being adaptable and engaging in higher levels of thinking in the new world. Reference: Falk, D., et al. (2012).
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”50px|||” custom_padding_tablet=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” custom_padding_last_edited=”on|tablet” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Brain-evolution.jpg” show_bottom_space=”off” admin_label=”Image – blog” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Image description” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”16″ text_line_height=”1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_margin=”20px||0px|”]Brain and Thinking Capital
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]However, despite our newest brain model, I profess that we have not upgraded our operating “Thinking Software”. To become the productive innovators and problem solvers this world requires, we will have to upgrade our thinking. We will have to sharpen our skills in communication, and become better at discerning fact from opinion. How to do this? We must probe further into our thinking, to be aware of what we are thinking and to understand our thought processes well. To develop a metacognitive mindset, we can begin by asking questions. According to Leonardo da Vinci, we should always remain curious in everything (curiosità) so that our brain has a strong desire to learn and improve continuously. By asking the right questions, we can make good value judgement and better decisions, thereby improving our life outcomes at work, in schools and in families for the better.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”50px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – quote” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”48″ text_font_size_tablet=”38″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.3em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” max_width=”900px” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”16px||30px|”]”Once you have developed your Brain Capital, you will be ready to reboot your brain with the latest version of your operating software: Thinking 2.0″
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]

Our world has changed dramatically over the years, so should our thinking in the way we think and how we think need to change correspondingly. To better engage and adapt ourselves in the new world, I will encourage you to spend a brief moment thinking about how to manage your knowledge manager—how to input new content, how to use tools to filter appropriate information and how to learn new techniques to think critically. Once you have developed your Brain Capital, you will be ready to “reboot” your brain with the latest version of your operating software: Thinking 2.0. As you start to build and enrich your Brain Capital, you will begin to feel differently and think differently in the way you perceive things and conceive ideas. So, who is the greater thinker? If you upgrade your Thinking Software, you could possibly become the next greater thinker.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”Section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#222222″ custom_padding=”0px||0px|”][et_pb_row make_fullwidth=”on” use_custom_gutter=”on” gutter_width=”2″ custom_padding=”40px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” parallax_method_3=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Human-Memory-e1494269459501.jpg” url=”#” show_bottom_space=”off” align=”center” force_fullwidth=”on” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#888888″ text_font_size=”12″ text_letter_spacing=”2px” text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”30px|||”]MEMORY
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Improve your Thinking and Expand your Life

 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Creativity-5-MOD.jpg” url=”#” align=”center” force_fullwidth=”on” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#888888″ text_font_size=”12″ text_letter_spacing=”2px” text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”30px|||”]CREATIVITY
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#ffffff” text_font_size=”24″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center”]Create and Innovate with Value

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Learning-1-e1494269520668.jpg” url=”#” align=”center” force_fullwidth=”on” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#888888″ text_font_size=”12″ text_letter_spacing=”2px” text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”30px|||”]LEARNING
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#ffffff” text_font_size=”24″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center”]Learn how to Learn for a Lifetime

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The Global Crisis of Nutrition and Mental Health

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#f7f7f4″][et_pb_row custom_padding=”|||” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_post_title meta=”off” featured_placement=”above” text_color=”light” text_background=”on” text_bg_color=”#313a54″ admin_label=”Post Title” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ title_font=”Rokkitt||||” title_text_color=”#e6e5e9″ title_font_size=”63px” meta_text_color=”#727c86″ text_orientation=”center” custom_css_post_image=”margin-bottom: -15px;||padding: 0% 3% !important;”][/et_pb_post_title][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”Section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_color=”#f7f7f4″ custom_padding=”0px|||” custom_padding_tablet=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on”][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Dr-Crawford-cirdular-photo-e1495649597761.png” show_bottom_space=”off” align=”center” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ custom_margin=”-48px|||” animation=”off” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – Author name” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Sans||||” text_text_color=”#323232″ text_font_size=”18″ text_line_height=”1.4em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”14px||0px|”]Dr. Michael Crawford
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – date” _builder_version=”3.4.1″ text_font=”PT Sans|on|||” text_text_color=”#363636″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” text_orientation=”center” module_alignment=”center” custom_margin=”0px|||”]

Global Nutrition Expert

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – intro” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”24″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.4em” header_font=”PT Serif||||” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”40px||0px|”]Last century the average height rose by about 0.4 inches/decade. Death from heart disease rose from a rarity at the beginning to be the first cause of mortality by half way through. Working at Makerere Medical College in Kampala, Uganda in the 1960s, it was clear that heart disease as was common in the UK, was absent in Uganda. Similarly, breast and colon cancers were absent. Oh yes, they had other health problems such as endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) which was the commonest cause of death from heart failure, a disorder hardly ever seen in the UK. The commonest surgical emergency was volvulus of the sigmoid colon: an excruciatingly painful condition. Again volvulus is hardly ever seen in the UK. Primary carcinoma of the liver was common in children. In the UK primary liver cancer in children is rare and cancer of the liver is usually secondary to alcoholism.
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 1″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” header_font=”PT Serif||||” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]

Research-based findings

We published some 60 peer reviewed papers in academic journals like the Lancet and Nature and British Journal of cancer the conclusion of which was that the difference between disease profile in Uganda versus the UK was basically nutritional. Yes, Burkett’s lymphoma first described by Dennis Burkett working with the NIH-USA Cancer Registry team at Makerere was the first proven cancer identified as caused by a virus. The contrast between Uganda and the UK was undoubtedly due to the contrasts in the two different food systems.

Yes, lifestyle came into it. However, lifestyle—let’s say lack of exercise—also has a nutritional fundamental. It influences what people eat and importantly what their body does with food ultimately determining how an individual’s cells and organs are fed. That is nutrition. Indeed, a famous scientist Bill Lands of the USA concluded many years ago that “the tissue is the issue”. We all vary in genetics and hence metabolic efficiency and we all do different physical things. What matters is what ends up in the tissues and that is nutrition.

Consequently, on return from East Africa to head biochemistry at the then Nuffield Institute for Comparative Medicine in London, I was astounded by the contrast in what people were eating in the UK compared to Uganda. Meat was not recognizable as meat. It was an apology of tissue infiltrated and marbled with fat consequent on absence of exercise, feeding the animals with high energy foods, antibiotics and growth promoters. I described this contrast in the Lancet in 1968.

The cost of mental ill-health was assessed at £27 billion. This was a cost greater than heart disease and cancer combined! When assessed in 2011 the cost came in at £105 billion. The Wellcome Trust website independently put the cost in 2013 at £113 billion. Moreover, mental ill-health is being globalized. If brain disorders continue to increase this century as heart disease did last, then we are looking at the breakdown of civilized society. It is time for action.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_width_px=”830px” use_custom_gutter=”on” gutter_width=”2″ custom_padding=”50px|||” custom_padding_tablet=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” custom_padding_last_edited=”on|tablet” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”3_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Uganda-cattle-MOD.jpg” show_bottom_space=”off” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation_style=”fade” animation_duration=”500ms” animation=”fade_in” sticky=”on”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ custom_css_main_element=”width:130px;” hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”16″ text_line_height=”1em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”130px” custom_margin=”20px||0px|”]Cattle freely living and nurturing in Uganda.
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||on||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”12″ text_line_height=”1.2em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”130px” custom_margin=”6px|||”]Dr. Michael Crawford
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”0px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 2″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”46px||0px|”]Consequently, on return from East Africa to head biochemistry at the then Nuffield Institute for Comparative Medicine in London, I was astounded by the contrast in what people were eating in the UK compared to Uganda. Meat was not recognizable as meat. It was an apology of tissue infiltrated and marbled with fat consequent on absence of exercise, feeding the animals with high energy foods, antibiotics and growth promoters. I described this contrast in the Lancet in 1968.

You can work it out quite simply without going into the detailed loss of essential fatty acids and other nutrients. A carcass fat content was 30% and lean 50%. This compared with a free-living equivalent in East Africa with 5% fat and 75% lean. Muscle (meat) in 4/5ths water so it is 1/5th protein and 1/5th of 50% lean is 10%. There are 4 calories per gram of protein so that equates to 10 times 4 = 40 calorie equivalents for the meat of an intensively reared UK animal. In Uganda, living animals are free to select their own food. The equivalent is 15 times 4 which is 60 calories equivalents: more! However let’s look at the fat. There are 9 calories per gram of fat. In the free living animal you get 9 times 5% which equals 45. In the UK animal, it is 9 times 30 which equals 270—a  great deal more indeed. That works out at 9 times the amount of fat per unit of protein on the UK animal compared to the Ugandan.

Now being trained in biochemistry and chemical pathology I had some idea about certain fatty acids which occur in tissue cell membranes being essential for life. You cannot make them so you need to get them in your food. The omega 6 fatty acids were known to be required for mammalian reproduction. There were also the omega 3 which people said were not needed. Nine of the less they appear in cell membranes. There was a consensus at the time that bad fats, sugar and purified carbohydrates were responsible for the rise in non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Saturated fats and transisomers were linked to atherosclerosis, thrombosis and coronary artery disease. These sorts of bad fats competed with the omega 6 essential fats. If there was a problem with bad fats, I thought what then about the brain which is made of fat – 60% of its building materials are highly specialized fats. Andrew Sinclair and I then set about analyzing the fats from the brains of 32 different species.

What we found was that they were all the same. The difference was in size not content. There are two fatty acids that were major constituents, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Arachidonic acid could be obtained from meat. By contrast, DHA was sparsely available on the land based food web but was very rich in the marine food web where it was also associated with iodine, another nutrient vital for the brain. We established already in 1973 that a deficiency of omega 3 fatty acids caused severe behavioral disorders in capuchin monkeys.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”50px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – quote” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”37px” text_font_size_phone=”32px” text_font_size_last_edited=”on|phone” text_line_height=”1.3em” header_font_size=”37px” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”900px” custom_margin=”16px||30px|”]”If brain disorders continue to increase this century as heart disease did last, then we are looking at the breakdown of civilized society. It is time for action.”
[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color=”#aeaeac” admin_label=”Divider” _builder_version=”3.2″ hide_on_mobile=”off”][/et_pb_divider][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 3″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]Later with Pierre Budowski from Rehovolt, in Israel, we showed that a diet rich in the omega 6 linoleic acid and deficient of the omega 3, fed to hatchling chickens resulted in bleeding and inflammation in the cerebellum of the chicks. The cerebrum is formed before hatching so the chicks can identify the mother and go about copying her feeding. The cerebellum by contrast develops after hatching as it has more to do with balance and coordination which in birds involves flying and that comes a few weeks later. However, the chicks fed the omega 3 deficient diet all died within 3 weeks. Add omega 3 to the diet and none died! Hence we concluded omega 3 fatty acids were truly essential and especially for the brain.

The, meat in the UK was so swimming in body fat that any arachidonic acid would clearly have a hard time making it to your tissues. The increasing use of intensively reared foods produced at cheaper prices meant that the traditional use of fish and sea foods was going out of the window. Remember that during food rationing during and after World War II, meat and milk were rationed but fish and sea food were not. Everyone ate fish and sea foods of all sorts including whale meat.

My wife and I then wrote a book in 1971. It was a story of our experience in nutrition and health in Africa and the contrast with the UK. In the book we predicted that unless action was taken to prioritize the nutrition of the human brain, then the accumulation of the wrong type of fats in the modern diet would result in a rise in brain disorders following the rise in heart disease.

The book was reviewed by Graham Rose in the Sunday Times. He essentially wrote that unless something was done “We would become a Race of Morons”. He clearly got the message. The problem is that no one else did or they did not want to get it!

In the scientific method a prediction is made and then tested to be true or false. We made a prediction in 1972 which was made crystal clear in the pages of the Sunday Times. With inaction, the prediction has been tested and now proved to be true.
[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”980″ custom_padding=”50px||0px|” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_image src=”https://worldbrainacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Mental-Hlealth-1-MOD.jpg” align=”center” admin_label=”Image” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ animation=”off”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”620px” custom_padding=”17px|||” padding_mobile=”on” column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax_method_1=”off” parallax_method_2=”off” admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ column_padding_mobile=”on” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”off”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text – blog 4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ text_font=”PT Serif||||” text_text_color=”#363636″ text_font_size=”20″ text_font_size_last_edited=”on|tablet” text_line_height=”1.5em” background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” max_width=”620px” custom_margin=”30px||0px|”]Brain disorders have now overtaken all
other burdens of ill-health. In 2004 the
cost was €386 billion for the EU. Of course
the critics said that ascendency was due to new diagnostics and new types of mental ill health. Well even so, at the top of the tree someone should have been concerned. A re- assessment was called for. In 2010 the cost of brain disorders was put at €789 billion. Following a question we had asked in Parliament Dr Jo Nurse at the DoH did the numbers for the UK in 2007.

The cost of mental ill-health was assessed at £77 billion. This was a cost greater than heart disease and cancer combined! When reassessed in 2011 the cost came in at
£105 billion. The Wellcome Trust Web site independently put the cost in 2013 at £113 billion. Moreover, mental ill-health is being globalised. If brain disorders continue to increase this century as heart disease did last then we are looking at the breakdown of civilised society. It is time for action.

As a species we have the rare capability to predict and respond. We can respond in a way to safeguard the future. We can either have 
a breakdown of society or achieve continued evolution of mental capabilities, health, and with it, prosperity. That is the choice. At the moment the direction being taken is to travel down the breakdown pathway. That choice 
is through ignorance. With the globalisation of mental ill-health we are facing the most serious threat to humanity. It is the future of our children that is at stake.
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